Fiesta Flavor

It only takes a handful of flavors to create unbeatably authentic Mexican and Tex-Mex dishes. The best kitchens stay stocked with quality, all-natural ingredients, and we’re proud to be one of them; because quality outweighs quantity every time. Have a look at some of the most important cocina essentials that have been tested by time and handed down for generations.

(Swipe to see more)

Avocados

The gift that gives us guacamole, creamy avocados have close to 20 vitamins and minerals in every serving.

Limes

Limes are more than just a garnish, adding a citrusy brightness to everything from snacks to main dishes.

Corn

Also known as maize, corn was first domesticated in Mexico about 10,000 years ago.

Hominy

Hominy, which is dried and treated maize kernals, is the main ingredient in classic Pozole.

TORTILLAS & chips

While tortillas can be flour or corn, tortilla chips are traditionally made by frying wedges of the corn variety.

Beans

Whole and refried beans are staples of the Mexican diet, with pinto beans and black beans topping the list.

Mexican Rice

This popular side dish, with its signature orangey-red color, is known as Sopa de Arroz.

Spices

Beyond adding color and flavor, many spices, like paprika, are low in calories and high in micronutrients.

Cheeses

Traditional cheeses like queso fresco, cotija, and panela mean “Mexican,” while Tex-Mex calls for a blend of cheddar and jack cheeses.

Meats

Proteins are the base of many Mexican recipes, while the sauces that top them define the dish.

Cilantro

Also known as Coriander, this herb’s leaves and seeds have an earthy, citrusy flavor.

Garlic

With the exception of sweets, garlic’s distinctly sharp taste complements almost any flavor.

Tomatoes

Tomatoes have a long history in Mexican cooking. They were first eaten in Southern Mexico in 500 BC.

Tomatillos

Also known as the Mexican Husk Tomato, tomatillos are the base of salsa verde.

Bell Peppers

A variety of bright colors and a uniformly crunchy texture add dimension to any dish.

Onions

Onions are a go-to ingredient in Mexican cooking, whether sharp or sweet, crisp or caramelized.

About Peppers

Fiesta Flavor

It only takes a handful of flavors to create unbeatably authentic Mexican and Tex-Mex dishes. The best kitchens stay stocked with quality, all-natural ingredients, and we’re proud to be one of them; because quality outweighs quantity every time. Have a look at some of the most important cocina essentials that have been tested by time and handed down for generations.

(Move cursor over ingredients to learn more)

Avocado

The gift that gives us guacamole, creamy avocados have close to 20 vitamins and minerals in every serving.

About Peppers
Back to Flavor

Pepper
Primer

With so many different varieties, colors, shapes and heat levels, it’s no wonder chile peppers are a hot commodity. In fact, so many chile peppers are grown around the world that their volume is measured in metric tons. But even though they aren’t unique to North America, when it comes to Casa Fiesta, their flavor is uniquely Tex Mex.

(Swipe to see more)

Hatch

Mild heat

Also known as Anaheim Peppers

Grown in the Hatch Valley of New Mexico

Sweet & tangy

POBLANO

Mild heat

Not fully ripened Poblano

Popular in Chiles Rellenos

Rich & earthy

jalapeÑo

Mild to high heat

Served raw, cooked or pickled

Vegetal & spicy

Serrano

High heat

Jalapeño-like Pepper

Eaten raw, or used for salsas and pico de gallo

Peppery with a bright finish

Chile de Arbol

High, acidic heat

Ripe form of Arbol Peppers

Used for cooking and decoration

Smoky, earthy & tannic

Habanero

Intense, burning heat

Ripe Chile Pepper

Popular in hot sauces

Fiery with citrusy undertones

Dried Anaheim

Very mild heat

Dried form of Anaheim Chiles

One of the most commonly grown peppers in the U.S.

Sweet & smoky with a hint of spice

Ancho

High heat

Dried Poblano Pepper

Used in both sweet and savory recipes

Mild, fruity flavor with earthy undertones

Chipotle

Medium heat

Fully ripened and dried Jalapeños

Often used in salsas and to make Adobo Sauce

Smoky, with a slightly sweet spice

Pasilla

Mild to medium heat

Dried Chilaca Chiles

Often mistaken for Poblano peppers

Subtly woodsy & smoky

Dried Arbol

Intense, acidic heat

Most popular form of Arbol Peppers

Similar to Cayenne pepper

Smoky, grassy flavor

Back to Flavor

Pepper Primer

With so many different varieties, colors, shapes and heat levels, it’s no wonder chile peppers are a hot commodity. In fact, so many chile peppers are grown around the world that their volume is measured in metric tons. But even though they aren’t unique to North America, when it comes to Casa Fiesta, their flavor is uniquely Tex Mex.

Hatch

Mild heat

Also known as Anaheim Peppers

Grown in the Hatch Valley of New Mexico

Sweet & tangy

POBLANO

Mild heat

Not fully ripened Poblano

Popular in Chiles Rellenos

Rich & earthy

jalapeÑo

Mild to high heat

Served raw, cooked or pickled

Vegetal & spicy

Serrano

High heat

Jalapeño-like Pepper

Eaten raw, or used for salsas and pico de gallo

Peppery with a bright finish

Chile de Arbol

High, acidic heat

Ripe form of Arbol Peppers

Used for cooking and decoration

Smoky, earthy & tannic

Habanero

Intense, burning heat

Ripe Chile Pepper

Popular in hot sauces

Fiery with citrusy undertones

Dried Anaheim

Very mild heat

Dried form of Anaheim Chiles

One of the most commonly grown peppers in the U.S.

Sweet & smoky with a hint of spice

Ancho

High heat

Dried Poblano Pepper

Used in both sweet and savory recipes

Mild, fruity flavor with earthy undertones

Chipotle

Medium heat

Fully ripened and dried Jalapeños

Often used in salsas and to make Adobo Sauce

Smoky, with a slightly sweet spice

Pasilla

Mild to medium heat

Dried Chilaca Chiles

Often mistaken for Poblano peppers

Subtly woodsy & smoky

Dried Arbol

Intense, acidic heat

Most popular form of Arbol Peppers

Similar to Cayenne pepper

Smoky, grassy flavor